Toaster Tuesday

Cheesy Tomato Toast with Bacon!
  • Ingredients
    • Sliced bread
    • Sliced tomato
    • Sliced cheddar cheese
    • Grated Parmesan cheese
    • Chopped bacon
    • Dry Italian seasoning

Instructions

  • Place a slice cheddar cheese on a piece of bread
  • Top with sliced tomato, Italian seasoning, bacon, and Parmesan
  • Toast in toaster oven at around 450-475 degrees Fahrenheit for 5-7 minutes.
Enjoy!
The Ag Wife

The Chicks Are Here!

Our chicks hatched on February 22nd as scheduled and were in the mail system that very afternoon! Newborn chicks are able to be shipped in the mail with a fair amount of ease. This is because when they hatch they come with a reserve tank of nutrients that will keep them healthy without feed for up to three days!

As everyone whose cracked an egged knows, there is the egg yolk and the egg white. The yellow egg yolk is absorbed into the chicks body cavity as it grows in the egg. When it hatches. The chick absorbs the rest of the yolk for proper nutrition! Pretty cool right? Of course this neat little physiology tidbit did not keep me from stressing about them until their arrival two days later.

When I picked them up at the post office they were chirping and ready to get out of there box. The box felt nice and toasty so I think the post office had some sort of warm place for the box to wait until I got there. When I got them home and had a look inside, I noticed they were all active, healthy, and dry. The hatchery expertly packed them with soft bedding and a special moisture absorbing pack of some sort. I made a short video that shows the package material at the initial unboxing of the chicks.

After they were unboxed and inspected, I took each chick out and dipped their beak in the water trough. This is an important step because they need to get hydrated as quickly as possible after being shipped. I also made sure that the water was about 98-100 degrees for the first two days they were home so when they drank, they would not lose body temperature.

While we were taking our initial count we noticed that we were sent three extra Rhode Island Red chicks. Now we have 12 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Plymouth White Rocks, and 1 Black Australorp for a grand total of 18 birds! We only wanted one male Australorp, but who knows what these extra chicks will turn out to be!

The overall health of the chicks has been fair to good. I have noticed the occasional wet stool and vent caking, so to help with this I added an extra water trough that contains special electrolytes along with their regular water. I also periodically remove any stuck fecal matter from their vents by soaking with warm water and gently rubbing with a warm wet cloth. If they continue to have issues I will add a probiotic to their water to ensure proper gut health.

As for the initial reaction from our daughter, she is ecstatic to say the least. She’s learned to call to the chicks and has since woken us up every morning calling, “chick, chick, chick, chick!” We hope she stays this excited as they grow and is able to learn about animals and where our food comes from!

Until next time…

The Ag Wife

Adopt a Pet Spotlight

Our first Adopt a Pet Spotlight subject is a chunky, cuddly pot bellied pig named Chumley! He has resided at Longmeadow Rescue Ranch since 2018 due to no fault of his own. The rescue staff have written an adorable bio about him I will post below.

“Chumley was purchased from a breeder as a piglet when he was just 2 months old. He was neutered as a piglet and lived in the same home until he was surrendered to Longmeadow. Chumley is a friendly and loving pig. He is very smart and eagerly waiting for someone to teach him some tricks. He doesn’t know how to walk on a harness but could quickly be taught. Of course, he is very food motivated. He also flops over for belly rubs. He came from a home with small and large dogs and got along with everyone. (although pigs should never be left alone with dogs)
Chumley’s previous owners told us that he is house trained and will ask to go outside. He is also crate trained. He also will allow you to trim his nails in exchange for belly rubs!
If you are looking for an indoor pig that would make an easy transition, Chumley is your guy! He has quickly become a staff favorite. He always greets visitors with a piggy smile.
Adoption fee 75
Before coming to adopt a mini pig please check the laws in your town and HOA to make sure they are allowed.
Adoptable animals can be seen by appointment only!”

If you are interested in more information about Chumley, feel free to get ahold of Longmeadow Rescue Ranch at (636) 583-8759
Ask for information about animal ID number A655951.

If you are interested in viewing other adoptable animals or want to look up adoption home requirements, visit Longmeadow’s website!

Until next time…

The Ag Wife

Toaster Tuesday

On the Sunny Side with Avocado
  • Ingredients
    • Bread
    • Avocado peeled and mashed
    • Parmesan cheese
    • 1 egg fried sunny side up
    • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  • Toast bread
  • Spread mashed avocado
  • Sprinkle with Parmesan
  • Top with egg
  • Salt and pepper
  • Sprinkle more Parmesan
Enjoy!

The Ag Wife

Exciting News!

Today’s post is going to stray slightly from our normal family farm updates to announce that we will be hosting a new weekly feature! Every week, I will be posting an article about pet adoption! Pet adoption is a wonderful and responsible way to bring home a new member of the family. There is one facility in particular I will be posting adoption information about that is located in Union, Missouri. Stay tuned for our Adopt a Pet Spotlight!

Tucked away between the hills and valleys in a small town in Missouri, there is a place that for the past 30 years has been a sanctuary to misplaced and mistreated animals of all shapes and sizes. Longmeadow Rescue Ranch was purchased in 1988 and has long since played a pivotal role in animal rescue and adoption. When browsing their website, one can view anything from chickens, to pigs, to horses that are in need of loving home. This organization proves that adoption isn’t just for cats and dogs, but all manner of creatures for a willing adopter.

Longmeadow goes above and beyond by matching adoptable pets with the perfect family. They even go as far as providing an entire equine training program and facility complete with expert trainers and staff to ensure horses and owners that partake in training are fully prepared for their new life together.

I cannot wait to go on this ride of awareness with Longmeadow Rescue Ranch and all of my dear readers! Get ready for a weekly dose of undeniable cuteness!

Until next time…

The Ag Wife

Chick Brooder

It is getting closer to when we will be receiving chicks to start a new flock here on our little farm! We are getting chicks by mail this round, which I have never done before. Because of this I have made some changes to my original chick starting plan. Instead of putting them immediately into the brooder in our coop, I’ve decided to make one out of an old water tank we had lying around and put it in our laundry room. They will need extra care after being shipped by mail and on top of that, we have been seeing extremely cold temperatures here in the Midwest, so the further from the weather the better they will thrive(hopefully). You can click here to see a short video about how I set the inside brooder up!

I have cardboard placed underneath the waterer and feeder so that shavings don’t get in the troughs and inhibit intake. I also placed them on the other side of the tank further away from the heat lamp. I did this to keep them from loitering around the feed and water. This will hopefully allow for easier access to trough space as well as clean and dry chicks.

I also have a red heat lamp that I will be conducting tests on soon to make sure it will be the ideal temperature for a warming space. Red heat lamps are recommended if you want to avoid interfering in the chicks natural light/dark patterns. Light plays a huge role in a chicken’s reproductive process. I talk about this a little in my other article Chick Days.

The only real issue I have with the set up is that it is a little small in terms of floor space. The recommended floor space per chick is about 6 inches. I have not done exact measurements of the trough but I am pretty sure it’s not going to allow that much space for 15 chicks. So, my plan for now is to keep them in this small makeshift brooder just long enough for them to bounce back from their travels and then move the to a more permanent brooding space in the coop.

The other thing I have done in preparation for these chicks is purchasing a bag of feed. This may seems like an easy task but there are some things you need to think about before just grabbing a bag of chicken feed. You need to make sure it is chick starter feed. You also have to decide if you want to get organic, medicated, or not medicated starter ration. I decided to start them off with a medicated bag that contains an antibiotic called Amprolium. I am usually not a huge fan of medicated feed but I will be using this to ensure my chicks bounce back quickly when they arrive at the farm. Once they do, it will not be necessary for medicated feed to be used unless they get sick. This of course is my personal decision for my flock. It does NOT mean it is the only and correct way to start birds. It’s really up to whoever is growing them.

This is the tag from my start ration bag.

The hatch date for our chicks is scheduled for February 22nd and arrival will be 1-3 days from hatch. We are ready to go and super excited to receive them!

Until next time…

The Ag Wife

Corn pudding

  • Ingredients
    • 1 box of corn muffin mix
    • 1 can cream corn
    • 1 can whole corn drained
    • 1/2 cup of butter softened
    • 1/2 cup sugar
    • 2 eggs
    • 1/2 cup milk
    • 2/3 cup plain Greek yogurt

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Cream together butter and sugar
  • Add eggs and yogurt and mix
  • Add muffin mix and milk and mix
  • Gently fold both cans of corn
  • Pour mixture into a greased 9×13 casserole dish and bake for about 30-40 minutes.

I like to make this with my Snow Day Stew. It’s really good crumbles up and mixed together with warm soup!

Enjoy!

The Ag Wife

Snow Day Stew

  • Ingredients
    • 3 medium potatoes diced
    • 2 cups of baby carrots chopped
    • 1 red onion diced
    • 2 tomatoes diced
    • 1 pound venison tenderloin diced
    • 1 pound ground pork sausage
    • 1 can green beans
    • 6 ounces tomato paste
    • 32 ounces of beef broth
    • 1 jar of beef gravy
    • 2 cloves minced garlic
    • 1/2 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
    • 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
    • 1/4 teaspoon chili powder
    • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
    • salt and pepper to taste
  • Tools
    • Crockpot

Instructions

This one is super easy!! Simply combine all the ingredients into a large crockpot and cook on high for 6-8 hours! If you don’t have venison you can you beef instead! I like eating it with cornbread or crackers.

Enjoy!

The Ag Wife

Tami Lou Fudge

This is a batch I made without pecans!
  • Ingredients
    • 3 cups sugar
    • 1 jar marshmallow cream
    • 2/3 cup evaporated milk
    • 1 1/2 sticks butter/margarine plus extra for greasing the pan
    • 1 bag semi sweet chocolate chips
    • 1-2 cups chopped pecans (optional)
  • Tools
    • A large pot
    • A large/sturdy spoon for mixing
    • 9×13 glass casserole dish

Instructions

  • Melt butter in your pot
  • Add sugar, marshmallow cream, and evaporated milk to the melted butter and cook on medium heat for about 5 minutes or until the sugar is dissolved. Make sure to stir constantly!
  • Remove from heat and add the semi sweet chocolate and pecans. Mix well.
  • Pour mixture into your greased casserole dish and let mixture set for about 5-10 minutes.
  • I store my fudge in the refrigerator after everyone is done eating. If you do this make sure to precut your fudge. Otherwise it is hard to cut once it is chilled all the way.

I like to make this for special occasions and holidays. The only trouble I have had is that sometimes I have a hard time dissolving the sugar before the marshmallow starts to burn in my pot. I address this problem by turning down the heat on the stove a bit. Last resort I will add a tiny amount of additional evaporated milk. However, if your fudge turns out to be slightly grainy it is still fine to eat and tastes good. Candy making takes some practice and this is a great recipe for beginners.

Memaw Edward’s handwritten recipe.

Enjoy!

The Ag Wife

Toaster Tuesday

Lox on Toast

Welcome to Toaster Tuesday! A mini recipe series about my creations in the toaster oven!

  • Ingredients
    • Sliced bread
    • Chive and onion cream cheese
    • Lox (smoked salmon)
    • Capers

Instructions

  • Toast bread
  • Spread chive and onion cream cheese on toast
  • Place lox on cream cheese
  • Top with capers
Enjoy!
The Ag Wife